Reader @SomethingBookish blog

I honestly don’t judge or dislike a person because they don’t read, it’s what non-readers say about reading that irritates me sometimes. If you’re reading this post, I’m assuming you’re a book lover or I shamelessly sent you a link and forced you to read this, either way, it must irk you a tiny bit when people say these things.

“What’s that book about?” as I’m reading it.

There’s a common misconception that if you’re reading a book you must be bored and need someone to talk to, and the people who believe in this misconception typically use the said book as a conversation starter. Please DON’T.

Honestly, unless you actually want to know what the book is about (though if you actually read anything you’d know better than to interrupt), just leave me alone to my reading. I’m not bored. I’m reading. I know you find that shocking, but please just let me read. Maybe then I’ll be able to answer your question. Just, maybe.

“Reading is just so boring, though.”

Errr, no. You’re just doing it wrong. People who think reading is boring haven’t read anything except what was required of them, and even I think required reading is entirely boring.

You have to find something you like, something you can get lost in, like The Seven Husbands Of Evelyn Hugo. It’s different for everyone. Find what works for you and start reading. Then please come back to me and retract your statement.

Readers Something Bookish blog

“You read? You must be so smart!”

First of all, this is insulting and offensive. Are you saying that if I didn’t read, I wouldn’t be perceived as intelligent? And what about all the people who can’t read? It’s true that reading makes you smarter, but so do countless other things, like living life, making mistakes, and learning from experiences, which are things that can only be transcribed as second-hand information in a book (though for a brief moment, a good writer can make a reader forget that). Intelligence is not defined by the amount of reading one does. Stop feeding this offensive stereotype.

“I don’t have time to read.”

And that’s your problem! We all have the same hours, minutes, and seconds in our days, and we have the power to choose how to spend the time we’re given each day. If you don’t have time, it’s only because you don’t choose to make the time.

We make time for what’s important, and excuses for what isn’t. Saying you don’t have time to read is the excuse you make because reading isn’t important to you. Every reader knows that a good book makes you lose all sense of time anyway (except the timing of the book, of course). That’s kinda the whole point.

Bottom Line


Read!

If you enjoyed this post, please click here to subscribe.